2021 Media Releases

Cat Found Frozen and Near-death Rushed to Ottawa Humane Society

Feb. 23, 2021 — On a frigid winter morning, Gerda, a two-year-old cat, was rushed to the OHS in critical condition after being discovered frozen on her finder’s porch.

Gerda’s body temperature and blood sugar were too low to be measured. She was emaciated and dehydrated. Her tail hung limp and one of her hind legs was broken. OHS veterinarians estimated that if Gerda had spent minutes longer exposed to the cold, she may not have survived.

The OHS clinic team worked quickly to raise Gerda’s body temperature and blood sugar to stabilize her.

Gerda’s tail was severely wounded and her fractured leg bone had broken through the skin. Amputating the damaged appendages was the best option for Gerda’s health and recovery.

Once Gerda was stable enough to receive surgery, Dr. Shelley Hutchings, OHS Chief Veterinarian, and Dr. Mary Thompson, OHS Associate Veterinarian, performed the operations to remove Gerda’s tail and leg.

“Gerda likely has a long road ahead of her,” says Dr. Hutchings, “But we’re optimistic that she will make a complete recovery.”

Gerda is currently resting in OHS critical care as she recovers from her ordeal and the surgeries.

Anyone who is interested in making a donation to help cover the cost of Gerda’s care may do so at: ottawahumane.ca/gerda

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Media Contact
Ottawa Humane Society
Stephen Smith, Acting Manager: Communications
stephens@ottawahumane.ca
www.ottawahumane.ca

Keeping Pets Safe During Cold Weather

Feb. 12, 2021 — The temperature is plummeting and the cold weather can pose serious risks to pets.

With the public health crisis, it is likely that many people are making plans to spend more time outdoors during the winter. The Ottawa Humane Society (OHS) urges pet owners to take precautions to protect their pets from freezing temperatures.

Keep your pet and other animals safe by following these tips:

  • Cats should live indoors year-round and never be allowed to roam in the cold. Limit the time your dog spends outside.
  • Take your dog for shorter, more frequent walks. Consider a sweater or coat for your dog.
  • Be sure to wipe your dog’s paws after returning from a walk to remove salt, sand and other chemicals designed to melt ice and snow.
  • Dogs that live outside are required by law to have an insulated doghouse built from weather-proof material, facing away from prevailing winds. The shelter must be elevated from the ground with a door flap and bedding.
  • Keep an eye on outdoor water bowls. Make sure your pet’s water hasn’t frozen over. Don’t leave your pet in a cold car for a long period of time.
  • Be mindful of animals that may have crawled under your car to keep warm. Bang on the hood a couple times to scare away cats and wildlife.

 

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Media Contact
Ottawa Humane Society
Stephen Smith, Acting Manager: Communications
stephens@ottawahumane.ca
www.ottawahumane.ca

Ottawa Humane Society Helps Thousands of Animals Through Partner Support

Jan. 28, 2021 — In November, the Ottawa Humane Society (OHS) relaunched its Emergency Partner Support Program, providing financial and other support to 22 partners in the animal welfare community.

“Since the beginning of the public health crisis, we’ve recognized that more can be done for Ottawa’s animals by standing together,” said OHS President & CEO, Bruce Roney. “Standing together means helping the organizations who share our vision of a more humane and compassionate community.”

By the end of 2020, the grants provided through the OHS Emergency Partner Support Program helped 2,800 animals.

The OHS has also held five partner sterilization days for partner organizations who have not been able to access these services due to the public health crisis. These sterilization days have provided spays and neuters to more than 57 cats who otherwise would not have received the surgery.

The OHS is making plans for how the Emergency Partner Support Program can be continued and what the program may look like as the pandemic unfolds and after the public health crisis. The OHS stands resolute in supporting the community and caring for Ottawa’s animals.

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Media Contact
Ottawa Humane Society
Stephen Smith, Acting Manager: Communications
stephens@ottawahumane.ca
www.ottawahumane.ca

Emaciated Dog with Chain Collar Embedded in Neck Finds Shelter at Ottawa Humane Society

Jan. 21, 2021 — In the late hours of Sunday, Jan. 10, bylaw officers delivered an emaciated dog in critical condition to the Ottawa Humane Society.

Found wandering the rural roads of Dunrobin, the Newfoundland mix, who the OHS has named Jake, was dragging a chain attached to a chain collar embedded in his neck.

“It was unimaginable,” says Dr. Shelley Hutchings, OHS Chief Veterinarian. “The collar had cut into him and the skin had grown overtop, leaving two ends of chain dangling from each side of his neck. The area was heavily infected, and the hair coat around his neck was matted with discharge.”

Shortly after arriving at the shelter, Jake began vomiting and it was clear that the team needed to act fast. Dr. Hutchings performed an emergency surgery to remove the collar.

Given Jake’s emaciation, the state of the wound, corn found in his stomach and a serious hook worm infestation, it is possible that he had been on the run for quite some time.

The OHS has reported the case for investigation into possible abuse or neglect with the province.

For those who would like to help cover the cost of Jake’s extensive care, a donation can be made at: ottawahumane.ca/jake

At this time, Jake’s outlook appears to be positive. OHS clinic staff closely monitor his progress and recovery as he stays in the OHS Critical Care Unit.

Media Contact
Ottawa Humane Society
Stephen Smith, Acting Manager: Communications
stephens@ottawahumane.ca
www.ottawahumane.ca

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